Tag Archives: lynching

That cop should NOT be lynched until all the facts are known,

And due process turns him loose.

Law School Discussion – Nine years of discussion on Recent Lynchings

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=37736.0

Topic: Recent Lynchings (Read 4236 times)

« on: July 11, 2005, 02:34:48 AM »
 Research of Past and Continued Racism Inflicted on African-Descent People in Springfield, Missouri, USA
A list of other incidents which indicate the degree of local racism are as follows:
Fall, 1994 – A nineteen-year-old African-American male was found hanged to death thirty miles north of Springfield. Although information to the contrary exists, his death was officially ruled a suicide.
December, 1997 – An African-decent man was brutally beaten by three European-American skinheads. He had to be taken to the hospital. Two of the skinheads were arrested, but they eventually received sentences of 5-years probation.June 17, 2001 – An African-American man was stabbed three times in a Denny’s Restaurant by skinheads (reportedly 15 skinheads-shaved heads, Aryan Nations tee-shirts, swastikas, and white supremacist tattoos). Although there were several witnesses at the time of the incident, no one had been arrested, despite the fact that the Justice Department was involved in the investigation. Community activists/advocates who had tried to get updated information about the case got no responses from the Justice Department representatives. Amazingly, around January 25, 2004, an announcement was made that local law enforcement officers along with the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) would be investigating the case. The community will have to see what happens.
August, 2001 – Four African-American county jail inmates were urinated on by two European-American jailers. Although the inmates had asked to speak to civil rights activists, such contact was denied. The inmates eventually received $25,000 settlements each. Yet most of them used the money to bail themselves out of jail, pay back child support and to pay their attorneys. At this writing, community activists/advocates who have filed a complaint about the incident with the U.S. Justice Department at the request of two inmates’ relatives have not received a response.August, 2002 – After an African-American man complained to the police chief about police harassment, he had a visit soon after from two European-American police officers who threatened to take him to jail if he ever complained to the chief again.October 2, 2002 – An African-descent male originally from Kenya was found hanged to death about a hundred feet away from the site of the 1906 lynching. His death was officially ruled a suicide, but community activists/advocates do not think so.

July 25, 2003 – An African-American youth (nineteen years old) was found dead hanging from a rope just outside of Springfield. This information circulated by word of mouth as the event did not end up being reported in the newspaper. Many people in the African-American community learned about the incident more than six months later.

Re: Recent Lynchings
«Article published Jul 9, 2005Teens face lynching charges in Gaffney
LYNNE POWELL,CherokeeCountyBureauGAFFNEY — A black 16-year-old who was assaulted by five white teenagers in an apparently racially motivated attack has already forgiven his assailants, his grandmother says.But BrendaClyburn says he still fears for his safety.Rising Gaffney High SchooljuniorIsaiahClyburn continues to recover from bruises, cuts and possible internal injuries after the five teenagers he had never seen before allegedly beat him Thursday evening.Isaiah was walking along Ellis Ferry Road about 6 p.m. after spending time with friends, enjoying his afternoon off from his part-time job at a local restaurant. As three trucks filled with the five boys passed, one of the boys yelled a racial slur before the trucks turned back down the road toward him.Christopher Scott Cates, 17, of 1120Campton Road in Inman, climbed out of one truck and began fighting with Isaiah in the road, Sheriff BillBlanton said.The four other teenagers — 18-year-old Justin Ashley Phillips of 207 Crooked Tree Drive in Inman, 17-year-old Kenneth Miller of 144 Colony Pike Road in Inman, Jerry Christopher Toney of 1005 Melody Lane in Spartanburg and 16-year-old Luke Grice of Inman — got out of the trucks and kicked and hit Isaiah, Blanton said.

Detective David Oglesby charged all five with second-degree lynching and also charged Miller with reckless driving. Grice has been charged as an adult. Lynching carries a maximum of 20 years in prison.

“I don’t know how else to say it, but an angel appeared and saved Isaiah,” Brenda Clyburn said.

The man Isaiah’s grandmother calls an angel hasn’t been identified by police or prosecutors, but Blanton said a man who was driving along Ellis Ferry saw what was happening, pulled Isaiah into his car and called 911.

The suspects got back into their trucks, and Miller wrecked the truck he was driving in an effort to leave before police arrived, Blanton said.

Brenda Clyburn said she and her son, Steven, are thankful Isaiah received minor injuries.

Isaiah was released from Upstate Carolina Medical Center and is recuperating at home. He wasn’t present Friday afternoon for the bail hearing for each of his alleged attackers.

The Clyburn family doesn’t bear any ill will toward the teenagers, and Isaiah, who became a Christian three months ago, has asked for prayers.

“I don’t really understand what the boys were doing,” Brenda Clyburn said. “I don’t know if they really knew what they were doing, if they’re ashamed or what, but (the severity of the crime) seemed to hit them when police put handcuffs on them.

“This could have been a terrible tragedy, but Isaiah had angels looking after him.”

Assistant Solicitor Abel Gray requested high bail for each of the suspects, saying they pose a threat to the community and have no ties to Cherokee County.

Cates has a pending charge of malicious injury to personal property in Spartanburg County. None of the other suspects have prior criminal records.

Gray told Judge Frank Crocker that Isaiah’s father fears for his son’s safety and described the attack as “vicious and heinous.” Gray also pointed to the “randomness” and “severity” of the assault.

Crocker set bail for each of the suspects at $50,000, ordered them to be home by 9 p.m. each night, and instructed them not to have any contact with the Clyburn family.

The suspects, wearing dirt-stained clothes from the day before, didn’t speak at their hearing.

Their families, some of them tearful during the hearing, would not comment.
http://www.goupstate.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050709/NEWS/507090321/1051/news11

http://thegrio.com/2010/11/09/missouri-corrects-record-on-1923-college-town-lynching/

Missouri corrects record on 1923 college-town lynching

Texas Romance With Secession and Rope-Dancing

Hi readers.

Probably a strong case can be made that the Texan love for the idea of secession is directly related to the long-term love affair so many Texans have with lynchings, beatings, bullyings, and executions.  Especially during the past 50-60 years the Federal Government’s been a terrible thorn in the side of folks who’d like to be able to drag accused offenders out of the jailhouse and hang them, as their ancestors were fond of doing.

The side of the Civil War in Texas a reader has to search deeply to find is the part involving Texas Homeland Security of the time.  Raping, burning, looting, confiscation of property, and indiscriminate lynching of anyone the forces of law decided might oppose secession or the Confederacy.

[Secession! Texas Makes Its Choice – Texas State Library and Archives Commission https://www.tsl.state.tx.us/exhibits/civilwar/secession.html]

According to the Texas Historical Commission, “Texas stands third among the states, after Mississippi and Georgia, in the total number of lynching victims. Of the 468 victims in Texas between 1885 and 1942, 339 were black, 77 white, 53 Hispanic, and 1 Indian. Half of the white victims died between 1885 and 1889, and 53 percent of the Hispanics died in the 1915 troubles. Between 1889 and 1942 charges of murder or attempted murder precipitated at least 40 percent of the mobs; rape or attempted rape accounted for 26 percent. Blacks were more likely to be lynched for rape than were members of other groups, although even among blacks murder-related charges accounted for 40 percent of the lynchings and rape for only 32 percent. All but 15 of the 322 lynching incidents that have a known locality occurred in the eastern half of the state. The heaviest concentration of mob activity was along the Brazos River from Waco to the Gulf of Mexico, where eleven counties accounted for 20 percent of all lynch mobs. Other concentrations were in Harrison and neighboring counties on the Louisiana border, adjacent to Caddo Parish, Louisiana, one of the most lynching-prone areas in the country, and in Lamar and surrounding counties in Northeast Texas.”

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/jgl01

A couple of examples of Texas Cultural Lynchmen at work:

Today in Texas History: Teenage boy lynched in Center

On this date in 1920, the body of Lige Daniels, an African-American teenager, hung in the main square of Center, a small town near the border between Texas and Louisiana.

Daniels was the victim of a lynching. In a 2001 story on Refdiff.com, columnist Dilip D’Souza described the scene: “Wearing a white shirt, torn pants and no shoes, his head tilted back sightlessly, this black teenager hung that day from the limb of a tree.”

D’Souza noted Daniels, imprisoned on allegations that he murdered a white woman, was taken from jail by a mob of nearly a thousand citizens, who carried him to the square where they hanged him.

D’Souza said the Daniels’ lynching garnered much attention but no local protests. Instead, there was so much fascination with the strung-up corpse that photographers turned the event into a postcard that was mailed to families and friends across the country. Daniels’ dead body became an article of trade.”

http://blog.chron.com/txpotomac/2010/08/today-in-texas-history-teenage-boy-lynched-in-center/

Or Jesse Washington, Waco.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynching_in_the_United_States

Texans have a legitimate pride in their history and their heritage.  Their heroes of the Alamo, of San Jacinto, of the wars with the Comanche, the Apache, the Civil War are, to Texans, reflections of what they are, themselves.  Their aspirations, their salutes, their strutting pride in a history they yearn to be a part of.

And being a part of the United States with its obstructive Supreme Court decisions, its attempts to stand between Texans and the act of being themselves, needs mending.

Needs another secession to open the doors to opportunities lost.

Old Jules