Tag Archives: pilot

That reincarnated kid video

Hi readers.  When you think about it the surprise is the Internet isn’t full of what?  Stories?  Reports?  Incidents?  Descriptions of this phenomenon and people for whom the experience is as real as their lives.

But you won’t come across it often.  There’s the 300 cases in India a European physician researched and wrote a book about a decade-or-so ago, and a lot of conjectures and suppositions.  And the million-or-so people who go around telling anyone who will listen which famous person in history they used to be.

That’s why this case comes across so strongly, I reckons.  That, and the fact the kid is from the US, whereas most research into the phenomenon has been elsewhere.

But this one was a US fighter pilot over Japan reincarnated as a kid in the United States.  Maybe nothing can be concluded from it beyond something I’ve never doubted anyway, that reincarnation happens.  But it’s possible if a person knew which parts of this not to draw any conclusions from a lot might be learned from it.

On the other hand, the human way is to draw all manner of conclusions from every shred of it, construct a doctrine and sand-cathedral from it, and figure out away to make money as a cash cow.

Glad to see the kid didn’t get any wisdom out of the ordeal.  Ought to be interesting to watch him along about time when he could volunteer for the US military.

Old Jules

 

On Civil Disobedience

N90172a

Hi readers.  Thanks for coming by for a read.

In 1983, after I’d been parking my old Cessna 140 at the Georgetown, Texas airport for several years I was suddenly the focus of a lot of questions from other pilots.

Gene [the fixed base operator] says you don’t have a pilots license.”  Boiled down, that was the question.  “He says he’s going to turn you in to the FAA.” 

I could see this might cause a problem.  I’d logged 500 hours pilot-in-command in my old 1947 Cessna, but I’d never been signed off for solo flight by a flight instructor.  I’d flown from Texas to Savanna, Georgia and back sleeping under the wing, carried passengers, chased cows, but I had never jumped through the hoops required by the FAA to become a licensed pilot.

Now someone had ratted me out.  No  way Gene could have found out about this unless someone dropped the dime on me, and anyone who told him did it knowing he was a sniveling rat who’d turn in his mother for a burned out license tag light just for the feel good.

Whew.  Going legal was never part of my program.  It was a complication and it would lead to other complications of legalities I’d been ignoring.  Getting annual inspections on my plane every year, for instance.

A guy named Tom Dixon, whom I’d done some scary flying things with had recently gotten his instructor ticket, so I got him to sign me off for solo flight, went through the various navigation requirements, hood time, studied the FAA manuals, took the written test.

I’ve told on another blog entry here somewhere about the FAA Flight Examiner in Austin who gave me my check ride.  About what he said when he examined my logbook.

But in the end I was a legal private pilot. 

As nearly as I could tell it didn’t make an iota of difference.

If I had to live my life over I suppose one of the few things I’d change would be learning to fly at an earlier age and never going legal.

Old Jules