Tag Archives: netflix

Take Out – A Chinese Illegal American movie on Netflix

Hi readers.  Who’d think a movie about a Chinese food joint in a US big city would be worth watching?  Well friends, it’s streaming on Netflix.

Take Out 2004 NR 88 minutes  An illegal immigrant gets behind on his debt to the crooks who smuggled him into the country, and has one day to find the money to make a payment. More Info  Starring: Charles Jang, Jeng-Hua Yu Directors: Sean Baker, Shih-Ching Tsou

The Chinese gangsters who fronted him the money to get here use a ball-peen hammer on his ribs when he sends some bucks back to his family in China and gets behind on payments at 30% interest.  So he delivers Chinese food all over trying to bicycle into enough tip money to keep them from coming back tonight.

Then he gets himself mugged out of it by some black guys in an elevator.  Late in the day.  He’s looking at a bad evening and he doesn’t even have to worry about multi-national banks, US Immigration Service, whatever.  All he’s got to worry about is which gangsters will rob him next.

But if he lives he dreams of bringing over his wife and son he’s never seen once his debt to the loan sharks is paid off in four, five years.

Different enough and interesting enough to cause me to give it a five star rating.

Old Jules

The Mooring – Everyone dies. I hope this doesn’t spoil it for you.

Hi readers.  Watching Black Rock and finding it intriguing and thought provoking inspired me to watch a movie that seemed to rhyme with it.  A movie I’d normally have avoided.  The Mooring was right there where a person could watch it stream on Netflix.

The Mooring 2012 R 89 minutes  A group of teen girls gathered in the Idaho wilderness for a program to help them lose dependency on technology become victims of a murderous rampage. More Info Starring: Hallie Todd, Thomas Wilson Brown Director: Glenn Withrow

But all it managed was a lot of gratuitous violence, screaming hysterical females, lousy judgement, misplaced confidence, and grounds for paranoia for people who weren’t scared enough already.

Otherwise it was a pretty good movie.

Old Jules

After Porn Ends

after p;orn ends

Hi readers.  A recently released study reveals the NSA, FBI, CIA, Homeland Security and local law enforcement agencies in the US account for the viewing of one million porn movies every day.  The White House, Congress amd Congressional Oversight Committees, and various concerned federal agency employees account for another million viewings.

All of which defines the importance of the movie, AFTER PORN ENDS, now streaming on Netflix.  A movie bulging with US national security concerns, political concerns, legal concerns and psychological health concerns.

After Porn Ends , 2010NR 93 minutes, This documentary explores the careers of some of porn’s top stars and examines their adjustment to “normal” society after leaving adult entertainment. More Info, Starring: Mary Carey, Asia Carrera
Director: Bryce Wagoner
 
What ever became, you’ve probably asked yourself, of Asia Carrera, Tiffany Million, Mary Carey, Crissy Moran, Seka, Amber Lynn, Shelley Lubbing, Erica Lauren, Raylene, Nina Hartley, Houston, Tera Patrick, Jenna Jamison, Roxy, and Laura Palmer?  What about John Leslie and those guys?
Thanks to the NSA, the FBI and Homeland Security, After Porn Ends tells it all.  Official interviews with all the stars of yesteryear.
 
And mostly they’re doing okay.  They made a lot of money in that business back when government employees and law enforcement officials couldn’t watch it free.  But all agree it’s a profession, an industry that’s suffered and gone down in quality along with diminished opportunities for the current run of porn stars.
 
John Leslie summed it up best.  “It was good while it lasted.  I had approximately 3000 beautiful women in my life, only worked a few days a year and made a lot of money.  I can’t complain.”
 
Mostly none of them had any deep regrets about choosing porn over other possible professions they might have been qualified for.  “I couldn’t have been better at anything else, couldn’t have made as much money.  I’d have to weigh that against the downside, such as having a lot of sex, doing a LOT of drugs, partying a lot, and having more fun than people experience in other jobs.  Mostly I think I’d do it again.”
 
Old Jules 

Pakistanis and Americans are alike about 2nd Amendment

Son of a Lion Trailer on YouTube:  http://youtu.be/hdRCmNn3joc

Hi readers.  Thanks for coming by for a read.

One of the coolest aspects of Netflix is the foreign film availability.  Even though the films are just movies, they tell a lot about what movie-makers worldwide thought audiences in their countries would willingly watch.  What, in fact, their national populations would pay money to see.  Their beliefs, their likes and dislikes.

So a Netflix watcher can discover, for instance, how similar a lot of Americans are to Pakistanis by watching  Son of a Lion.   It’s a 2007 movie in which the primary characters are involved in a family business of gun making, gunsmithing, and gun sales and have been for several generations.   Expected to go into the family business, the 11-year-old son of a strict Muslim father runs away from home, determined to get an education instead.  In the location in Pakistan where they live everyone is a 2nd Amendment devotee.  Nobody bothers with signs or bumper stickers because they just raise their AK 47 or 1911 Colt and loose a few rounds into the air when the mood strikes.

Starring:Niaz Khun Shinwari, Sher Alam Miskeen Ustad, Director:Benjamin Gilmour. 

It’s comforting knowing how much we have in common with Pakistanis for the most part.  The father in the story is mujahedeen and fought against the Russians in Afghanistan and is extremely concerned where, should he allow his son to take to school, it would be located.  “Those schools are magnets for American bombs!” 

Probably a lesson there somewhere.

Old Jules

Netflix, Mahjong, computer chess and good books

Hi readers.  Thanks for coming by.

For the past while my physical prowess has been challenged enough to force me to find alternatives to just reading and meditating, while Jeanne’s pointed out my brain might be failing me from lack of oxygen.  So, she introduced me to Mahjong online to exercise my brain cells.  Which she has no confidence will help.

http://www.freegames.ws/games/boardgames/mahjong/freemahjong.htm

But I’ve been enjoying it.  Online Mahjong makes for a middling good way to pass some time so long as you make it clear you’re not going to put up with any BS from it.  Just hitting the reset button when it tries to throw near-impossible tiles onto that right side and top will keep it towing the line.

Similarly, computerized chess will throw a lot of BS at you, but there’s no easy way of escaping it.  Conceding the games early, immediately after it takes your queen, does cut down of the time wasted, but even that finds a traction point eventually.

And all work and no play leads me to movies.  A place I haven’t been in decades.  Jeanne’s son, Andrew, subscribes to Netflix and allows me to use unlimited streaming video [cheeze I love that phrase] access to their movies.

Watched out movies I haven’t seen except as a kid or teenager, watched movies I loved as a young adult, movies filmed in times a lot different from these. And sated myself out.  Huk, starring George Mongomery during the early 1950s is an example.  Movie about a ‘native’ Filipino uprising after WWII against the US plantation owners.  If we allow the moviemakers to tell us whom to root for we’ll be cheering for the plantation owners every time a little brown brother gets himself shot.

What I’ve learned is there are one hell of a lot of independently made low-budget movies out there capable of providing a type of entertainment I don’t believe movies and television have ever before quite managed.  Maybe the funniest I’ve seen yet was an independent titled, “A Fork in the Road“.    I’d never have had the pleasure of it if I’d not been blessed by a failing vehicle.

Another hilarious one was “Unidentified“.  And a number of Russian ones, Pakistani, Chinese and Korean made movies have offered themselves up for my admiration and piddling around waiting to die or whatever it is I’m doing.

As for good reading material, I’m getting more of it than I can absorb.  Jeanne’s library jobs are fine that way.  Catching up on Terry Pratchett novels, a nice history, Quantrill at Lawrence, The Untold Story, by Paul R. Peterson, One Summer, America 1927, by Bill Bryson,  Prescriptions for Herbal Healing, by Phyllis A Balch, CNC, and Trials of the Diaspora – A History of Anti-Semitism in England, by Anthony Julius.

To name the ones I’m in the process of reading right now.

Saw Harry and Tonto with Art Carney a couple of weeks ago on Netflix.  Reminded me of how differently I viewed it when I saw it sometime in the early 1980s.  And I resonated far too much with it, Hydrox and myself, to watch it through without dropping a few tears.

Hydrox is hanging in there day by day, for those interested.  Who will outlive whom is up for grabs.

Old Jules