Tag Archives: prison

It’s no Disney World, but it still draws a lot of business

federal prison gated community

Hi readers.   Thanks for coming by.

A lot of you have probably never been to a federal prison, so I thought you might enjoy seeing one of our more famous local attractions.   A lot of people come here to see it and decide to stay a while.  It seems almost majestic to me, but of course I have a biased view, being a resident of the town.

People come from all over the country to see this place and hobnob with like minded residents.

Of course, there are five, or more prisons in this community [nobody seems sure] including one other federal one.   In addition to providing food and shelter for hundreds, maybe thousands of individuals, it’s a source of employment for multitudes.   In my coffee group meeting twice a month at the Council on Aging more than a fourth of the 20+ old guys who attend are retired from prison careers.    Interestingly, no long-time released inmates are part of the group.

Five gated communities in a single small urban environment might seem a lot for those accustomed to Santa Fe, Santa Barbara, or Tuscon.   But around here it feels just about right.    After all, there’d be no place for all those inmates to stay if we had fewer gated communities.

Old Jules

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Gun Hill Road and Orange is somethingorother Black

Hi readers.  Jeanne doesn’t watch movies much but someone told her I might enjoy some made-for-Netflix movie about women in a prison facility.  Which I figured what the hell, might as well try it.  Which I did.  I’ve been known to watch and enjoy a chick flick and if the chicks are all in prison it might still be interesting.

Orange Is the New Black

2013-2014TV-MASeason 2 Now Available A dozen Emmy Award nominations went to this acclaimed comedy drama series including Outstanding Comedy Series, Outstanding Writing and Outstanding Lead Actress for star Taylor Schilling. A crime she committed in her youthful past sends Piper Chapman (Schilling) to a women’s prison, where she trades her comfortable New York life for one of unexpected camaraderie and conflict in an eccentric group of fellow inmates.

Fact is when I worked in Santa Fe with the Emergency Management Bureau we had some female prisoners working in our offices for a while, cleaning up and polishing our non body parts.  But they started stealing so much when nobody was looking it became too much a pain in the ass to have them around.

Then, in Grants, when I was working for the motel.  We had some female prisoners cleaning the rooms for a while.  But they began selling sexual favors to anyone who’d pay, began screwing the motel manager until he was too exhausted to allow them around anymore.  The regular female employees who usually filled his sexual needs began feeling neglected.  So Orange whatchallit got my attention briefly.

I skipped over all the lingering chickflickisms, the slow motion leading-up-to-sex scenes, the flashbacks of flashbacks of flashbacks.  The titillating leading-up-to lesbian stuff I also found I could skip past.

Which left approximately 10 minutes of viewing pleasure for this episode of Orange is somethingorother.

But Netflix, because I’d watched it, recommended Gun Hill Road.

Gun Hill Road 2011 R 86 minutes Enrique returns home from three years in prison to find his wife is a virtual stranger and his son is in the throes of a sexual identity crisis. More Info Starring: Esai Morales, Judy Reyes Director: Rashaad Ernesto Green

A decent sort of guy gets out of the slammer and finds his wife is on the rebound from an affair.  Handles it fairly well.  Gets a job.  Handles it less well when he discovers his eldest son is one of those other kinds of guys.  Wears sexy female attire and whatnot.

At that point I debated whether I wanted to watch any more of it, but while I was pondering the question the son began smooching with another character in the movie and feeling around, unzipping his trousers.

Soooooo.  I’m not anti-Semitic about that sort of thing.  Don’t even care if my brother marries one.  Or my sister, for that matter.

But that isn’t the same as saying I want to see a lot of details of what they do to one another working up to the other stuff they do to one another.

I’m old fashioned that way.

Old Jules

Now realllllly – Some things might be worse than dying

Mary Jane and Sniffles

They know Mary Jane ain’t going to kill them.  Lying about it, pretending it might just proves to them you’re a liar or a fool and that nothing you say is worth taking seriously.

Wouldn’t it be better to just tell the truth?

Ah baby! Yes.  Yes. YES!

Ah baby! Yes. Yes. YES!

“What will your mother say when you get out of the slammer and she discovers you’ve been anally raped by every ethnic prison gang ranging from the White Brotherhood to the Crips, the Bloods, to La Raza Unita? 

“That you were forced to perform oral sex every night for the  guy  in the top bunk?”

Mommy wants that to happen to OTHER peoples’ kids and doesn’t want you to know she wants it for them, but she sure as hell doesn’t want it to happen to hers.  So she tells you the next best thing.  A lie.

Papillon


Hi blogsters:

A couple of days ago I came across a tattered copy of Henri Charrierè’s, Papillon on the bookshelf.   I’d read it many times over the decades, but there’s always one more read left in it, it seems.  This might be the last.

Charrierè’s autobiography always has something new to tell me, depending on where my life is when I re-read it.

Papillon (Charrierè) was transported to the French prison islands of Guinea in the Caribbean in 1931, where thousands of prisoners were kept out of sight and mind of the French citizenry.  Devil’s Island was the most well known, but it was only one of the camps where 80 percent of the prisoners died before serving out their sentences.

The book is a story of courage, determination, brutality, as Papillon goes through a series of escape attempts, dungeons, unthinkable tortures, solitary confinements at a time in history when the ‘civilized world’ was no more civilized than it was before, or since.  Eventually, he escaped and became a worthy citizen of Venezuela from 1945 until he wrote the book in 1967.

In some ways the writing and the stories both remind me of the fiction works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Strange how some nationalities get all the credit, while others manage to escape notice.  The Spaniards and Portuguese take their battering from the waning memories of the Inquisition.  The Russians from the Gulag camps.  The Chinese from the Great Cultural Revolution.  The Belgians from the terrors they poured onto the Congo.  The Cambodians, the Ethiopians and the Germans have all been held up to the light and examined with appropriate repudiation.

Somehow the Brits and the French just managed to escape notice when the recognition for some of the vilest institutionally sanctioned acts of human brutality in modern human history.

Papillon.  A book worth reading and thinking about by all you ‘jail’em-til-they-rot’ enthusiasts.

We haven’t caught up to the French, Brits, Spaniards, Cambodians, Chinese, Russians, Belgians, Germans, and other civilized nations yet.  But we have the ingredients.

Plenty of prisoners and prisons.  A freedom-loving population of the same kind of jurors, courts, prosecutors who sent Papillon and thousands of others off to a life and deaths they’d never tolerate for any cute animal that appeared in a Walt Disney film named Bambi.

Old Jules

Papillon Trailer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DARD1l-tr6g

Papillon(1973) – Theme from Papillon
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNp_3dpiTno&feature=related