Tag Archives: recipe

Cilantro tortillas

Okay readers.  I know a lot of you are desperately sick of hearing new food concoctions invented because they don’t include salt.  But there might come a time after the apocalypse, or Y2K, or your stroke or coronary thrombosis when you’ll say to yourself, “Dayummm.  Wonder if I can find Old Jules blog again?  I sure wouldn’t mind having me some of them masa harina pancakes!”

When that happens maybe this think will still be here, easily located by dogpile.com search engine.

The key is the relationship between a given amount of  masa brosa and water.  Trip down to a store where such things are sold and look for a package, MASA BROSA – Masa Instantanea de maiz.   Harina de Maiz.

It’s cheap.  And once you have it you can forever hence use a ratio of 2 cups of masa to one and one-eight [1 1/8] cup of water unless your water happens to be thick and muddy, or if it comes from downstream of the sewer plant.  If that’s the case you’ll have to experiment for the right texture.

Anyway, you’ll soon get the feel of the dough when it’s right.  You can use a tortilla press, but you don’t need one.  Mash it down with the bottom of a pan, your hands, a rolling pin, or walk on it.  Makes no difference.

Once you understand that relationship between water and masa the sky is the limit.  I don’t personally care to make two cups of masa in one batch.  I use half-cup of masa with quarter+1 tablespoon and make a single, big thick tortilla [or pancake, pita whatever] and it’s usually all I need.  It’s too easy to make to justify doing any ahead of time.

This morning I mixed in chopped cilantro, threw it into a really hot frying pan [no oil, spray, no nuthun] and made one hell of a nice tortilla to be placed underneath fried eggs.

But the concept works with almost any herb and you’ll be hearing about some of them if you keep reading here.  Today I just want to tell you about the cilantro because that’s one real people would pay good money for a taste of while they’re scarfing their eggs.

Old Jules

Improving on the near-perfect – no sodium catsup substitute

Hi readers.  I posted this ersatz salt catsup substitute recipe a while back because it’s so almost perfect I figured you’d love it if you tried it.  But today I trumped that recipe.  I added three large green onions into the blender with the rest.  Watched them get liquified with everything, then added about half a bundle of fresh cilantro.

I believe with some jalapeno in the mix this might provide the best salsa I’ve ever eaten.  And not one speck of salt added anywhere in the equation.

sweet pepper and bells

Hi readers. Thanks for coming by for a read. I’m sitting here dipping home-made no sodium catsup substitute in Art’s & Mary’s no salt homestyle potato chips.

So shoot me. Fact is, this catsup substitute tastes so much better than catsup a person might as well call catsup a substitute for whatever this como se llama delicious concoction is. And it’s so damned easy to make they ought to put grocers in jail for carrying the original salt-bomb Hunts, Heinz, you name it catsups on the shelves. Killing people slowly.

sweet pepper and bells in blender

What you need to make Como Se Llama? Sweet peppers and/or Bell peppers of various colors. A blender. 3/4 cup apple cider vinegar. A cup of sugar, or however much less you prefer. A tablespoon of black pepper.

sweet pepper and bells blended

Blend it until it’s all liquid, adding the sugar and vinegar while it’s blending. I use unground peppercorn and let the blending reduce the grain size with everything else.

sweet pepper and bells ireducing

Once that’s done all you need to do is put it over medium heat and bring it to a boil, then let it simmer until it’s reduced approximately 1/3, but mainly is the thickness you prefer in a Como se Llama. Keep it in mind you’re using it for a dip.

If it gets so you’re on the road or for come other reason can’t make Como se Llama, you can always stop into a grocery store and buy a bottle of catsup for a temporary substitute.

Old Jules

No sodium catchup substitute better than catsup

sweet pepper and bells

Hi readers.  Thanks for coming by for a read.  I’m sitting here dipping home-made no sodium catsup substitute in Art’s & Mary’s no salt homestyle potato chips.

So shoot me.  Fact is, this catsup substitute tastes so much better than catsup a person might as well call catsup a substitute for whatever this como se llama delicious concoction is.  And it’s so damned easy to make they ought to put grocers in jail for carrying the original salt-bomb Hunts, Heinz, you name it catsups on the shelves.  Killing people slowly.

 sweet pepper and bells in blender

What you need to make Como Se Llama?   Sweet peppers and/or Bell peppers of various colors.  A blender.  3/4 cup apple cider vinegar.  A cup of sugar, or however much less you prefer.  A tablespoon of black pepper.

sweet pepper and bells blended

Blend it until it’s all liquid, adding the sugar and vinegar while it’s blending.  I use unground peppercorn and let the blending reduce the grain size with everything else.

sweet pepper and bells ireducing

Once that’s done all you need to do is put it over medium heat and bring it to a boil, then let it simmer until it’s reduced approximately 1/3, but mainly is the thickness you prefer in a Como se Llama.  Keep it in mind you’re using it for a dip.

If it gets so you’re on the road or for come other reason can’t make Como se Llama, you can always stop into a grocery store and buy a bottle of catsup for a temporary substitute.

Old Jules

Delicious low sodium hamburger

Hi readers.  I just devoured one of these  and can testify there’s none better.

  1. When you make up your ground beef patties use onion powder as a flour to separate the patties.  But first sprinkle on lime powder, coriander, black pepper.
  2. Thaw one Pattie and cook or grill it.
  3. Using two slices of low sodium sandwich bread paste on home-made catsup [no sodium] made from sweet peppers and rice vinegar blended and boiled.
  4. Prepare the bread surface with no sodium catsup below cilantro, chopped green onions and spinach leaves on one slice.
  5. If you like mustard, mix a tablespoon of mustard flour with equal amount of water and spread on the surface of the remaining bread slice.
  6. Place the meat, cooked to taste, on the bread with the spinach, cilantro, and green onion, then cover it all with the slice covered with mustard.

Beats hell out of traditional hamburgers and you only get the salt that came naturally in the ground beef, plus 30-60 mg of salt in each slice of bread.

Old Jules

Afterthought:  If you don’t have an economical source for lime juice powder and onion flour [powder] you can buy it by the pound from www.FirehousePantryStore.com  – the mixture of onion flour and lime juice powder is the absolute best substitute for salt I’ve found, bar none.  Beats the stuff sold as salt substitutes such as wossname, Madam Upso Salt and Mr. Ersatz Sodium all to hell.

 

Easy no-salt potato-jalapeno pancakes

Hi readers.  Thanks for coming by for a read this morning.

I gather some of you besides me count sodium mgs in your diet the way overweight people used to count calories.  If so, and if you’re on the lookout for a tasty treat you’ve probably never encountered before you might try this.

Blend or process a potato, a jalapeno, half an onion, a tablespoon of minced garlic and a teaspoon of grated ginger together until they reach the color of guacamole and the consistency of pancake batter.  [Works well without the ginger, too, whole different culinary experience.  I’m betting cinnamon could fit into it somewhere, to doctor it up into a mutation worthy of a space alien.]

[Edit:  Cilantro.  I forgot to mention adding some chopped up fresh cilantro.  Important, too]

Pour the mix into a sizzling pan of olive oil or butter and flip them a couple of times as they cook until they’re brown on both sides.

Pop those moneymakers into a dish and eat them like pancakes, or let them cool and eat them the way you’d have a bagel or donut.  Great under blackstrap molasses and buttered, great dry.  Name your own poison

Remember where you heard it first.

Old Jules

Saimen – Another trek into Ramen country

Hi readers.  I’ve been planning to share this with you a while but keep forgetting.

Back when David McCreary and I got bounced out of Peace Corps India X training at Hilo, then jumped the plane to seek our destinies in Honolulu  we were dirt poor.  Sharing a room at a rooming house up on East Manoa Road.  Him working as a drink waiter at the Kohala Hilton, me busboying down at the Makahiki of the Hilton Hawaiian Village.

Dirt poor, so we ate a lot of Saimen.  Something I’ve never heard of since, but a person could get a bowl for a quarter at any food joint in Honolulu.

So I began a while back experimenting, trying to recreate Saimen using Ramen.  Bought green onion, chopped it all the way back to the tips of the green, all the way forward to the root.  Threw in minced garlic, ginger, fish, or chicken, or meat if I had some.  Sometimes a dash of curry, habenero, whatever comes to hand.

Boiled down all the other ingredients a considerable while to make a strong flavored broth.  Then at the last minutes of the just-right tastehood, added Ramen noodles, or small diameter pasta sticks.

This stuff’s as good today as it was in 1964 in Honolulu.  It would even be good if 1964 never happened and had to get replaced with some other year.

Just saying.

Old Jules

Super Baked Fish Recipe

I used the Vietnamese Pan-something-or-other fish I told you about on earlier posts.

Bed the bottom of the pan with half-dozen corn tortillas,

1 each frozen fish filet

1 cup frozen green beans

1 cup frozen brocolli

1/4 cup tropical trail mix

Generic Cajun seasoning to taste

1/4 stick butter on top

Bake 60-90 minutes at 350 F.

You can be the second person in the Universe ever to try it if you hurry.

Old Jules