Tag Archives: Vietnam

When John Wayne and James Bond became murdering war criminals

Hi readers.  I’ve mentioned in the past that Air Force enlisted men don’t get to be as John Wayne and James Bond when they’re dreaming up lies about their youths.  The Air Force mostly just didn’t offer up too many simple opportunities for lying about combat experience for non-pilots.  But there’s an exception to every rule.  A guy named ‘Chip’ Tatum is out there proving me a liar.

Tatum claims he’s a murderer, that he was a part of death squads for the military and CIA!  He claims he helped Oliver North smuggle in tons of cocaine a bit later.  ‘Chip’ Tatum is a jewel of a human being, even though most of what he claims he’s done is probably a pack of bald face lies:

Chip Tatum

Gene “Chip” Tatum was a Vietnam Special Forces Air Combat Controller Defense Intelligence Asset, and US Army special operations pilot flying classified missions during the US invasion of Grenada, Tatum was also involved in the Nixon Administrations relations with China, NASA’s Apollo Program, the Iran Contra Affair, and several other classified intelligence operations dating through through 1992.A 25-year CIA deep-cover agent and a member of the ultra-secret Pegasus “hit” team” working directly for the sitting President.

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/12/14/confessions-of-a-us-death-squad-commander/

Confessions of a US Death Squad Commander

Prior to the public release of the existence of the Presidential “Kill List”, Secret units comprised of Military, Ex-Military, Intelligence and Ex-Intelligence officers operated under the control of a secret organization within the Federal Government. These units are referred to in the media as “Death Squads”

by Dick M D.G. "Chip" Tatum 1976Prior to the public release of the existence of the Presidential “Kill List”, Secret units comprised of Military, Ex-Military, Intelligence and Ex-Intelligence officers operated under the control of a secret organization within the Federal Government. These units are referred to in the media as “Death Squads”A death squad is an armed group that conducts extrajudicial killings or forced disappearances of persons for the purposes of political repression, genocide, or revolutionary terror. These killings are often conducted in ways meant to ensure the secrecy of the killers’ identities.

Death squads are often, but not exclusively, associated with police states, one party states, or military dictatorships. It is not unheard of, however, for democratic governments to form death squads.

Death squads may have the support of domestic or foreign governments (see state terrorism).  They may comprise a secret police force, paramilitary groups, or government soldiers and policemen.

When death squads are not controlled by the state, they may consist of insurgent forces of Privatized Security companies or organized crime.

The following is the story of one such Death Squad Leader subsequently finding himself in prison on the charge of Treason.

Gene “Chip” Tatum joined the Air Force Special Force as a forward air controller in the early 70’s, at age 19. He went to US Army Special Forces school and was assigned to South-East Asia as Airman First Class (A1C) in December 1970, he was assigned as a radio operator on a Forward Air Control (FAC) aircraft attached to Task Force Alpha (secretly under operational control of the CIA, but on paper it looked like it was under the 56th Special Operations Wing, and under the major command, US Pacific Air Forces (PACAF), under the Joint Chief of Staff and Secretary of Defense.

56th Special Operations Wing and Task Force Alpha were operating out of Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base Phnom Penh, Thailand. As to how much of a secret this was I don’t know, but it appears the US did whatever we could to keep our operations there secret.  I have noted more about 56th Special Operations Wing at the end of this article.

Shortly after being assigned to Thailand, Airman Chip Tatum, assigned to a task force code-named, Team Red Rock. The team was composed of Airman Tatum, eight US Army Green Berets, three US Navy SEALs and two CIA paramilitary officer or (aka direct action) or contract agents/soldiers (a total of 14 US men) that was under operational control directly from the White House.

A plan had been drawn up by Siagon (Theodore “Ted” Shackley) and ordered by President Nixon, Henry Kissinger and General Alexander Haig, operational direction by Ted Shackley and Bill Colby, Team Red Rock was to enter Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh, and secretly attack the Pochentong airport, military and civil installations, and destroy all of the Cambodian air force parked there, or as many as possible. The plan called for the team to parachute into the outskirts of Phnom Penh.  They were tasked to take with them formerly captured, North Vietnamese Army (NVA) POWs wearing their NVA uniforms, but were unarmed and alive.  The plan was to murder the POWs and leave their bodies to be discovered by Cambodian forces.  The purpose of this was to makes the Cambodian leaders come to the false conclusion that the North Vietnamese were responsible for the attack.  This kind of operation is called a “False Flag” operation.   This whole plan including the murders was approved and ordered by President Nixon, Henry Kissinger, General Alexander Haig.

According to Tatum, he and the rest of his team were dressed in North Vietnamese uniforms as were the NVA POWs,  This is a violation of the Geneva and Hague convention (a war crime) and the team could be shot as spies if  were captured.

It was also part of the secret mission, and ordered by Pres. Nixon, Kissinger, and/or Haig, that Team Red Rock was not to come back from this mission alive in Cambodia alive.  A detachment of Montagnard tribesmen working for the CIA, was assigned to kill everyone of the team and dispose of the bodies to make sure no word about this mission ever leaked out.

Chip Tatum is not very forth coming in his video interview with Ted Gunderson, a former FBI Chief of Station, for Los Angeles.  It will help you in understanding what I am telling you here, if you watch the following video tape after reading this.

READ MORE HERE

WEBSITE: WWW.CHIPTATUM.COM

So, they guy’s in prison on charges of treason and by all accounts he’s getting off light.  Other people get caught smuggling even a microscopic piece of cocaine end up coming out of a lifetime in jail with an anus capable of having a Volkswagen parked inside it.  But, if convicted, Tatum isn’t even likely to suffer what people not even charged with crimes have gone through at Guantanamo.

Naturally this particular veteran’s asking for help with his legal defense.  Figure that one out.

If Chip Tatum isn’t guilty of anything else he ought to be congratulated for finding a package of lies allowing enlisted Air Force vets to be as damned John Wayne and James Bond as the other branches of the service.

Old Jules

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They wore out the Muslims – familiarity bred contempt

Hi readers:

The ‘Us’ government’s searching frantically for a new threat, trying to create a believable illusion of  a new cold war with Russia, then talking increased military tensions with China.  But it ain’t easy.

Sure, Russia still exists.  On paper, anyway, run by a bunch of Mafia-types who know they can’t make any money if they’re all shot to pieces by anyone, including the Us.

And China?  Well, even though Washingtonians are prone to stupidity and self-blindsidedness, most recall the Us hasn’t won a war since 1945.  And the ones it didn’t win most spectacularly were coincidentally in Asia.

Fact is we couldn’t even defeat little bitty pissant North Korea in a shooting war back when our soldiers were still real he-men.  We couldn’t even whip North Vietnam, or fight them down so’s they’d let us leave in a relaxed, organized way.  The Us left Vietnam in an every-man-for-himself devil-take-the-hindmost scramble.  Running and looking over their shoulders the whole time.  Peace with honor, Nixon called it.

So who is going to be scared Washington will be stupid enough to get into a war with China?  Nobody.  Who’s going to believe anyone in Washington is going to get us into a shooting war with the Rooskies?  Nobody.  And they’re scared of everyone in Asia, including North Korea.  Nobody wants to see North Korea kick our asses in another shooting war.

Trouble is, nobody’s scared of the Muslims anymore.  Every time we send the military somewhere new over there they roll over and play dead without racking up a decent death-toll of Us troops.  Sure, they kill a few, and a lot more Us troops raise the ante by killing themselves, but even with that it’s just not enough to get the juices of patriotism flowing anymore.

One thing they mightn’t have considered, though:  Asians can win wars against Asians.  Fighting a good proxy war with China using Japanese troops might work and since no Us troops need be getting shot up, the Us citizenry could probably get behind it.

Even better, getting the South Koreans and Japanese fighting on the same team, invading Manchuria, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Nanking and so-on might work.

I can see how the Us citizenry might get behind that if only for the relief from the ennui of yawning Muslim terror snores it would provide.  And we could sell the weaponry to both sides.

The only way we’re likely to ever win a war in Asia now that Japan has its guard up.

Old Jules

 

The Vietnam War finally explained

Why are these men not in jail? (photo: Getty Images)

Above:  People carefully avoiding inadvertent visits to Vietnam.  http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/345-justice/22925-vietnam-is-sentencing-corrupt-bankers-to-death-by-firing-squad

Hi readers.

I’ve you’re like me the two burning mysteries of the 20th Century concern US submersion into two foreign wars:  WWI and Vietnam.

WWI will probably always remain a piece of unexplainable and unexplained craziness.  But suddenly the underlying reason for the Vietnam War bubbles to the surface of 21st Century reality almost out of nowhere.

The bastards execute corrupt bankers!

Vietnam Is Sentencing Corrupt Bankers to Death by Firing Squad”  http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/345-justice/22925-vietnam-is-sentencing-corrupt-bankers-to-death-by-firing-squad

Sheeze!  There was never anything in that country worth a single US life and it never made any sense any US troop had to set foot on the soil there.  Just some crazy-assed paranoid ‘domino theory’ was how they justified it at the time.  But secretly the US Government probably knew the Vietnamese were capable of thinking outside the box.

Any place that has the potential for standing corrupt bankers up before firing squads and blowing them into the next lifetime is sure as hell a place that needs stopping.  That’s the sort of idea that could catch hold.

Dangerous stuff.

Hell, if we had another hundred yards of Vietnam Memorial Wall and it saved the life of one corrupt banker it would be worth it.  Executing politicians, bankers, war industrialists is just the sort of subversive thinking that caused the Russian Revolution.  Got the whole fatcat aristocracy sitting on the heads of starving peasants killed off and replaced by a different kind of killer-shark.

We’ve been a bit short of wars lately, but here’s an opportunity to fill the gap.  But this time, a Constitutionally legal war declared by the US Congress.  A new Vietnam War everyone who matters will be able to understand and sympathize.

Bomb those bastards back to the stone age.  Destroy them to save them.

Fact is, if this were adopted in the US it would silence all this dissent about the death penalty.  Likely there’d be ticker-tape parades.  Where the hell would that leave us?

Remember where you heard it first.

Old Jules

 

 

Cheated by Mexicans – Taking what’s rightfully ours

Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places – Johnny Lee 1980

Hi readers. Thanks for coming by.

We’ve got all these wars and troops all over the place but what the hell do we ever gain by it? Sheeze. Vietnamese farm fed fish in the grocery stores? Korean made television sets? Afghanistan heroin? Was it worth it? The only worthwhile thing we ever got from Vietnam and Korea were Vietnamese and Korean women who married GIs and improved the US breeding stock. We’ve been looking for love in all the wrong places.

Fact is, with all these recently discovered shale oil deposits recently discovered making us the most oil-rich real estate on the planet, it’s time we corrected an error made in 1848 by our sainted ancestors. When they snagged that little chunk of real estate from Mexico and brought the army home they had no idea about shale oil deposits. They left Mexico with way the hell more land than they needed.

Those Mexicans hadn’t learned their lesson yet about selfishly hoarding so much land they didn’t need and had no rightful claim to. Right here on our doorstep, land they cheated us out of by not telling us about oil shale and what might be under all that land we allowed them to keep. And who knows what other stuff they’ve got under there they aren’t telling us about? Stuff we might need later.

Those troops in Afghanistan aren’t getting us a damned thing except planeloads of heroin. The trouble with that war is that it’s not visionary. It’s too far from home and eventually everything the US gains there will have gone into the veins of a bunch of addicts, aside from a few Swiss bank accounts of politicians and military gurus.

We US citizens are sick of being cheated by Mexico and Mexicans sneaking in here stealing our grunt labor jobs nobody wants, sneaking around having valuable mineral resources they didn’t tell us about last time US troops had to go down there and kick ass.

This time we need to do it right. This time we need to take the whole damned place so’s we don’t have to do it again. Move the US Border Patrol down to Yucatan where it can do some good keeping Guatemala where it belongs.

Old Jules

Mexican–American War
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican%E2%80%93American_War

Mexican Cession 1848
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mexican_Cession.png

Mel King

The hoopla about the dead cop in Tijeras got me thinking about my old friend, Mel King, and another dead cop just down the road from this one in Mountainair, New Mexico, in 1987. 

That one changed Mel’s life in a multitude of ways, for all the remainder of it.  I posted this on another blog December 21, 2005, the anniversary of his death:

If I ever write another book, Mel King will have to occupy a few chapters of it.  I’ve mentioned him a few times on this blog, but mostly, I’ve not been able to write much about him at all.  I’m still digesting what happened to him.

On one of the threads recently the discussion drifted to the War on Drugs.  I suppose if I’d never met Mel I probably wouldn’t have thought much about that issue, would never have bothered to form an opinion about it.

But in many ways, Mel was a product of that war, from the time it began during the Reagan Administration, he was one of the adversaries.  It changed him from a small-time marijuana growing woods-vet to a wealthy man.  When the ‘war’ drove the price of jade sky-high he was approached by a number of ranchers in the area, asked to teach them how to grow weed in quantity.  He became their broker, as well as a grower.

The War on Drugs involved Mel in a major felony arrest, confiscation of much of his property, caused the mysterious death of a police officer, got Mel targeted repeatedly on America’s Most Wanted television series, and constant harassment by the FBI, State Police and local police for the remainder of his life.

They wanted to believe he killed a Mountainair, NM, police officer because it was the only construction of the facts that didn’t expose the rotten core of the War on Drugs.  If Mel didn’t kill that cop, another cop, or cops, almost certainly did.

Unacceptable.

Shortly before he was murdered in December, 2004, he showed me an anonymous, hand-written letter accusing him of killing the policeman and threatening to come balance it all.  The undertone and nuances of the letter suggested it was written by another member of the ‘policeman brotherhood’ who wanted to even things out, not because he knew the dead cop, but because a person doesn’t get suspected of killing a cop and get by with it.

It’s time I began writing down a few things about Mel King anyway.

Mel King was a major, financially successful marijuana grower and large-scale broker in New Mexico for many years.  During that time he was also a long-term heroin addict.  (He first became addicted to morphine while in the hospital recovering from wounds he got in the Marine Corps in Vietnam).

The only way Mel got away with what he was doing for so many years was by being considered a complete maniac, and by making certain the authorities got their fair share of the proceeds.  He drove around in a VW van with bullet-holes in the windshield from the inside.

When he got busted in 1987, with 150 pounds in his house it was because he made himself too big a nuisance to be allowed to go on.  He was attracting too much attention.

But even so, he never came to trial.  That 150 pounds of high-grade vanished from the evidence lockers.  The empty bags with his evidence numbers on them were found in the home of the policeman who made the initial stop during his arrest.  But someone murdered that policeman, probably for the marijuana, which is how they happened to find the empty evidence bags.

While he was in jail awaiting bail, Mel resolved to turn his life around.  He freed himself from heroin and when he was released he started a successful furniture business, did his best to stay clean for the remainder of his life.  Succeeded in being a trustworthy, successful man and one of the best friends I’ve ever had.

During the years I knew him, Mel was a deeply spiritual man.  He was honest, guileless, hard-working, sincere, courageous, and in many ways, wise.  We prospected a lot of canyons together, talked of many things over campfires listening to the wind in the pines.  He was also my partner during Y2K.

Mel and I disagreed on many things, but he believed, as I do, that he knew what happens to a man when he dies.  He never feared death and he never believed he’d done anything in this life to give him any reason to fear it.

I believe he was right.

Old Jules

Introduction to Being a Hermit

The following is an email that Old Jules wrote several years ago and subsequently posted on a previous blog. I’m posting it after his description of the Peace Corps experience to give continuity to that time period.  ~Jeanne

Old Jules:
This was the most recent of a long line of exchanges with an online friend, a man  who mostly he believes his life is a living hell out of habit, except when he reminds himself he’s blessed, which is only when I remind him to remind himself, thinks I.

Thought I’d share it with you blog readers.  I don’t believe I’ve ever mentioned my brief life as a hermit.

Morning Pal:

I suppose you’re right.  You live a complicated life.  It would be complicated, just with your interpersonal relationships, even if you didn’t have a job that would be enough to satisfy most needs for complication.  Even if you didn’t have a piece of real estate that’s located in and part of a subtle war zone.  It’s relatively easy to imagine how you’d have some difficulties focusing, relaxing, or anything else.

A long time ago, when I had a complicated life, I used to wonder whether a stay in the sort of place where you work, an asylum, would do the trick as a means of getting me removed from the system of complications I’d built around myself to help make myself unhappy.  I concluded that it wouldn’t.

 I also gave some thought to whether prison life would do it, but unless it was one of those kinds of Federal prisons all the Watergate folks went to, I don’t think it could.

Thought about a Trappist monastery a bit, even.  That might do it.  I don’t know, but it seemed so otherwise out of sync with my nature that I never tried it.

But I had the advantage over most people, because I knew what I was missing.  When I got booted out of the Peace Corps in 1964, after a bit of time trying to complicate my life in Honolulu the way a person will, I was contacted by the US Army Reserve telling me they wanted to know where I was in case they wanted to reactivate me for Vietnam if they needed people with my particular MOS.  In those early days of 1965 nobody knew where all that was going and reactivating the reserves was considered a real possibility.

My support for US military adventures overseas went away entirely during my tour in the Far East.  I was gonna have nothing to do with Vietnam.  I decided I was going to spend the remainder of my life as a hermit living in the jungle on the big island….. a place called Wiamono Valley on the drainage of the Kohala range…. used to be a village in there but it was wiped out by the tidal wave in 1947 and nobody laid claim on it since.  Nobody in there but a blind mule and me…. for six weeks that mule had company.

That six weeks with nobody to talk to but a blind mule changed my whole life.  It was a pivotal moment for me, one of the greatest blessings of my stay in this reality this time around.  In addition to a book-full of other benefits, it gave me a realization of what’s possible for a human being, mind-wise, if he can succeed in either simplifying his life, or in (I didn’t know then) distancing himself from the web of values, properties, interpersonal relationships and other tangle we do our best to mire ourselves in so we can’t see or hear what we’re trying to keep from seeing and hearing…… the voice of what’s beneath.

I definitely understand what you’re saying, my friend.  Hang in there.

(Old Jules)

Vietnam or Korea – Flip a Coin

Even for people who lived it, the past squirms around and tries to avoid close examination of how things looked going in, compared to how things appeared later.

It’s not easy for the mind to put itself into a time when Vietnam wasn’t a name anyone would recognize.  But in 1962 when all the enlisted men in my unit in Massachusetts were required to attend counter-insurgency training the first session required an explanation:  “Vietnam is Indochina.  Next to Laos.” 

Everyone had vivid recollections of a ‘brink of war’ incident in Laos a short while earlier.  And Everyone remembered the daily news reports from a few years earlier of the French getting themselves soundly booted out of French Indochina.

Counter-insurgency training turned out to be the pointee-heads in the US Army feeling around for soldiers interested in one of two particular types of duty.  ‘Special Forces’ units were being organized, mainly for people who’d already gone through Airborne and Ranger training.  Some were already serving in Laos, Cambodia and Thailand.  “Sneaky Petes” they were dubbed.

The other type was the Military Advisory Group.  MAG.  Regular troops stationed in remote areas with Republic of Vietnam units to provide advice, which we Americans were already good at giving a lot of without following it ourselves.

We went through the training, but nobody from my unit volunteered for either of those duties.  But within a couple of months three of us who’d attended the training were levied for overseas, to Military Advisory Groups in Vietnam.  May, or June, 1963, we’d arrive there.

In those early days a soldier, even an enlisted one, had a number of options regarding assignments, despite the initial levies, if he played his cards right.  Sitting down with a friendly Sargeant-Major early in the game and asking advice was the first step.

Vietnam and MAG duty was considered a ‘hardship’ tour, as was Korea, and at that time, Alaska.  It wasn’t combat duty.  It was just one of the particularly lousy places a troop could be sent in the service of Queen Jacqueline Kennedy.

It’s a tough call.”  Sargeant-Major Griggs had served all over the Pacific during WWII and afterward.  “Korea’s colder than hell in the winter.  It’s the reason we call it ‘Frozen Chosen’.”  He held up his hand showing me the finger he’d had shot off while he watched the Chinese coming across the Yalu River during the Korean War. 

But unless you want to take a chance on getting Malaria, you might be better off in Korea.  All that crap down in the South Pacific is a mosquito hell.   If you’d like me to I can call the Sargeant-Major of the Army in the Pentagon and see if we can get you a tour in Korea instead of Indochina.”

So, after kicking it around a while, I asked him to make his call and find me an assignment in Korea.  May, 1963, I found myself on the USNS Sultan with around 2000 other GIs headed for Frozen Chosen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Admiral_W._S._Benson_(AP-120) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USNS_General_Daniel_I._Sultan_(T-AP-120).jpg

We had a wild old time on the Sultan.  The cruise was a long one because every few hours they’d shut down the engines and lower some kind of sensor to the ocean bottom as part of an ongoing undersea research project.  The sea was generally calm, almost glass most of the way, porpoise and flying fish cutting the surface, sometimes banging themselves against the side of the ship.

Below-decks fortunes by enlisted-man standards were lost and won in 24/7 poker, gin, and rummy games.  So long as there was no fighting nobody cared what went on down there. 

We reached Pearl Harbor and everyone got shore leave for a few hours, preceded by dire warnings about HASP.  Hawaii Armed Services Police.  “Don’t mess with them.  Do what they say or you’ll end up in the stockade or back here on a stretcher.”    But 2000 GIs with cabin-fever were too many even for the HASP to keep in line.  “Be back on board by midnight.  Anyone who isn’t checked in here at midnight is going to wave us goodbye from the stockade.”

Hotel Street briefly had all the usual suspects of merchant mariners, US Navy, and enough wild-assed drunk youngsters off the Sultan to satisfy the most discerning needs of the community.  At 11:30 I was standing in line at a tattoo parlor waiting to get a tattoo on a dare.  The guy in front of me was getting a cherry tattoo with the words, “Here’s mine!  Where’s yours?”

As the artist finished up someone shouted, “We’ve got to get back to the ship.  We’ll be lucky if we make it!”

Luckyluckyluckylucky.  Back on board as everyone began sobering up the head was full of GIs trying to wash off tattoos.  One guy had “In Memory of My Mother” with a rose vine wrapping itself around a tombstone on his bicep.  “She ain’t even dead.  What the hell did I do that for?”

More endless days at sea, a brief stop in Japan for half-dozen of us toughees to get the socks whipped off us outside a bar by three Australian Merchant Mariners, and on to Inchon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_General_J._C._Breckinridge_(AP-176)

13 months later the trip home on the USNS Breckinridge was a different matter entirely.  The sea was rough, pervasive odor of vomit on all decks.  Discipline severe, pecker checks every few days to ferret out the multitude of VD cases.   I’ve sometimes thought those troop-ship pecker-checkers might have found the sorriest job a human being could have.  Imagine hitting the floor in the morning knowing you’re about to have to watch 2000 of those things milked down before breakfast.

And everyone suddenly knew exactly where Vietnam was.  Rumor had it anyone who was going stateside reassignment would be going there in a few months.

Old Jules