Important distinctions between Democrats and Communists

adults and kiddies

During the early 1950s it became important to distinguish the difference between Communists and Democrats.  This was no easy thing to do.  Something was needed to establish a clear delineation, easy to recognize.  After pondering the matter several years, in 1954 Congress finally found the key:

http://voices.yahoo.com/when-was-under-god-added-pledge-allegiance-3187545.html

The decision of Congress to add “under God” to the Pledge was, at least in part, a reaction to the Cold War with Soviet Russia. One of the differentiating factors between Soviet Communism and American Democracy was that the Soviets officially advocated atheism. The phrase “under God” was seen, therefore, to reaffirm an important distinction between the two competing worldviews. [Source: Religion and the Law in America, p. 110-12].

“On June 14, 1954, President Eisenhower signed the bill officially adding “under God” to the Pledge of Allegiance. The President remarked that, “millions of our schoolchildren will daily proclaim in every city and town … the dedication of our nation and our people to the Almighty.” [Source: Slate.com]”

Seemed simple enough until someone wondered aloud, “But how can a person distinguish a Christian from a non-Christian?”  After a lot of pondering and head scratching they were forced to resort to The Apostles’ Creed, 312 CE.

http://www.reformed.org/documents/apostles_creed.html

“The Apostles’ Creed
(as usually recited today)
“The basic creed of Reformed churches, as most familiarly known, is called the Apostles’ Creed. It has received this title because of its great antiquity; it dates from very early times in the Church, a half century or so from the last writings of the New Testament.
“I believe in God, the Father Almighty,
    the Maker of heaven and earth,
    and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord:

“Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost,
    born of the virgin Mary,
    suffered under Pontius Pilate,
    was crucified, dead, and buried;

“He descended into hell. [See Calvin]

“The third day He arose again from the dead;

“He ascended into heaven,
    and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty;
    from thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.

“I believe in the Holy Ghost;
    the holy catholic church;
    the communion of saints;
    the forgiveness of sins;
    the resurrection of the body;
    and the life everlasting.

“Amen.”

Extremely helpful during the Vietnam War.  A person of Asian ethnicity who could recite the Pledge of Allegiance and the Apostle Creed could be said with confidence not to be a Communist.  Anyone who couldn’t, was.

Same as today.

Sometime I’ll tell you about the trauma those of us who’d already learned the Pledge went through trying to figure out and remember where to say the phrase, “under God” and where to pause when including it.

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18 responses to “Important distinctions between Democrats and Communists

  1. I too remember when ‘under God’ was added to the Pledge of Allegiance. I also did not believe there would be a time in our country when it was considered unlawful to pray to God or Jesus in public.

    When I was in school the day began with a prayer, salute the flag and say the Pledge. I didn’t know flags had been removed from classrooms until the American Legion Post in our town in Florida began a program to replace them. My how things have changed.

    God bless. Enjoy your posts.

  2. Aren’t the days of the litmus test behind us?

    • Hi Swabby. Probably it’s the particular test that’s been upgraded. All manner of things a person could get shunned for saying, or chased after and caught. It’s just being a communist that ain’t so bad. Far better than being a sexist, say, or a person who fails to be sensitive. Gracias, J

  3. Thanks for sharing. When I was in school it was already included. I never felt traumatized saying it, in fact I enjoyed saying the pledge.

    • The trauma, Keith, was a matter of two teachers in front of an assembly of kids trying to agree whether it should be, pause, under God, or under God, pause. I probably got out of the Army before I ever got it right after that. Never could remember whether Mr. Burke turned out right, or Mr. Doak. Gracias, J

  4. They’re still pledging the flag at the public school where I work. This being Kansas, I doubt that it will go away any time soon.

  5. It sounds like a good system, except around here they say that the communists will say anything just to get into power… Of course, I don’t know about the Democrats.

    • ShimonZ: I’d guess it ain’t just communists. Unless things are a lot different there. Here Democrats and Republicans will say anything, but nobody believes them unless they agree with what was said. Usually what’s said is character assassination involving someone on the other side of the issue. Gracias, J

  6. Hi Jules, I remember learning the pledge in the first grade in Miss Marshall’s class in 1951. Sometime in 1952, while still in her class we had to learn it with the words “under God.” I found it hard to insert the new words. Looks like from the history you noted that school kids weren’t the first to learn it the new way.

    Just an interesting sited note. There are a couple of changes in the Apostles Creed that are made by some denominations. Descended into the dead instead of hell and Holy Spirit instead of Holy Ghost. (guess it is less spooky for little kids, chuckle). Blessings. Mary

    • Hi Mary. I guess the human mind is un-trustworthy. I’d swear I distinctly remember that assembly with Mr. Doak and Mr Burke in 1957 … But I’d swear to it less hard after reading your post.

      Jeeze, Ms. Marshall. I can’t have thought about her in 65 years. I was in Miss Della Dacus’s 1st grade class out in the army barracks converted 1949 …. I recall being scared to death of MRs Marshall, all the kids being scared of her.

  7. Hi Jules, The assembly may well have been in 1957. I was in Jr. Hi. from the fall of ’57 to the spring of ’60. I don’t remember the assembly you are referring to. Considering how many we had in Jr. Hi. I would guess we had about 39 +/- two or three assemblies every year and that times 3…. roughly 115 of them. Well, my memory isn’t that great. The ones that stand out in my memory are the plays the college drama team brought to us, a juggler, dancers, choral groups and gymnastics. Seams there was one by some guy with relics from South America and the head hunters. I remember getting to see shrunken heads, poison tipped spears and a huge snake up close in his trailer that he displayed all this stuff in.

    Yes, most kids were scared to death of Miss. Marshall. She was one of my favorite teachers and I did very well under her teaching. My best friend didn’t and had to repeat first grade. I don’t remember Miss Dacus.

    Blessings.

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