Category Archives: 2013

Amazingly toothsome no-sodium/low sodium salad

great salad

Hi readers.  Jeanne suggested I take a picture of this and post it.  I’m not certain why.  I just got sort of carried away making that salad and as always, it turned out toothsome.

Spinach, bean sprouts, frozen grapes, frozen cranberries, sesame seeds, chopped celery, celery seed, chopped carrots and sweet peppers, raw peanuts and snow peas [chopped].  Dressing is rice vinegar and olive oil with a dose of minced garlic and some ginger.

Takes a lot to fill the void, but the sour from the cranberries discourages over indulging.  Not unpleasantly, but insistently.  This one made two meals, second one as appealing as the first.

Old Jules

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Curry steamed ginger blueberry okra pepper asparagus on rice

This rice/veggie steamer might be the single electrical appliance I've used more than any other my entire lifetime.  Originally cost me $1.00 still in the never-been-open-box at the Salvation Army Thrift Store, Kerrville, Texas.  Several years of heavy use for that buck.

This rice/veggie steamer might be the single electrical appliance I’ve used more than any other my entire lifetime. Originally cost me $1.00 still in the never-been-open-box at the Salvation Army Thrift Store, Kerrville, Texas. Several years of heavy use for that buck.

Hi readers.

I like to get a few calories with my meals, so I used half-jar of strawberry preserves from Dollar Tree [$1.00] as chutney.  Spices added were celery seed, black pepper, lime powder, onion powder, in addition to the various chopped poblanos Anaheim green bell peppers and fresh cilantroso on in the taste explosion.

Curry steamed ginger blueberry okra pepper asparagus on rice: If it’s looks you’re after you could toss a sprig of parsley across it, I suppose, or add a slice of orange, maybe.

It went down smooth and easy, didn’t attempt to come back up.  All’s well that ends well.  And the ticker won’t be sneaking around finding excuses to blink or belch from the sodium.  Prepared with no sodium added, this is a no sodium meal.  On the other hand, if you want it to be a 2 gram sodium meal add two grams of salt.

Old Jules

The Vietnam War finally explained

Why are these men not in jail? (photo: Getty Images)

Above:  People carefully avoiding inadvertent visits to Vietnam.  http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/345-justice/22925-vietnam-is-sentencing-corrupt-bankers-to-death-by-firing-squad

Hi readers.

I’ve you’re like me the two burning mysteries of the 20th Century concern US submersion into two foreign wars:  WWI and Vietnam.

WWI will probably always remain a piece of unexplainable and unexplained craziness.  But suddenly the underlying reason for the Vietnam War bubbles to the surface of 21st Century reality almost out of nowhere.

The bastards execute corrupt bankers!

Vietnam Is Sentencing Corrupt Bankers to Death by Firing Squad”  http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/345-justice/22925-vietnam-is-sentencing-corrupt-bankers-to-death-by-firing-squad

Sheeze!  There was never anything in that country worth a single US life and it never made any sense any US troop had to set foot on the soil there.  Just some crazy-assed paranoid ‘domino theory’ was how they justified it at the time.  But secretly the US Government probably knew the Vietnamese were capable of thinking outside the box.

Any place that has the potential for standing corrupt bankers up before firing squads and blowing them into the next lifetime is sure as hell a place that needs stopping.  That’s the sort of idea that could catch hold.

Dangerous stuff.

Hell, if we had another hundred yards of Vietnam Memorial Wall and it saved the life of one corrupt banker it would be worth it.  Executing politicians, bankers, war industrialists is just the sort of subversive thinking that caused the Russian Revolution.  Got the whole fatcat aristocracy sitting on the heads of starving peasants killed off and replaced by a different kind of killer-shark.

We’ve been a bit short of wars lately, but here’s an opportunity to fill the gap.  But this time, a Constitutionally legal war declared by the US Congress.  A new Vietnam War everyone who matters will be able to understand and sympathize.

Bomb those bastards back to the stone age.  Destroy them to save them.

Fact is, if this were adopted in the US it would silence all this dissent about the death penalty.  Likely there’d be ticker-tape parades.  Where the hell would that leave us?

Remember where you heard it first.

Old Jules

 

 

Easy no-salt potato-jalapeno pancakes

Hi readers.  Thanks for coming by for a read this morning.

I gather some of you besides me count sodium mgs in your diet the way overweight people used to count calories.  If so, and if you’re on the lookout for a tasty treat you’ve probably never encountered before you might try this.

Blend or process a potato, a jalapeno, half an onion, a tablespoon of minced garlic and a teaspoon of grated ginger together until they reach the color of guacamole and the consistency of pancake batter.  [Works well without the ginger, too, whole different culinary experience.  I’m betting cinnamon could fit into it somewhere, to doctor it up into a mutation worthy of a space alien.]

[Edit:  Cilantro.  I forgot to mention adding some chopped up fresh cilantro.  Important, too]

Pour the mix into a sizzling pan of olive oil or butter and flip them a couple of times as they cook until they’re brown on both sides.

Pop those moneymakers into a dish and eat them like pancakes, or let them cool and eat them the way you’d have a bagel or donut.  Great under blackstrap molasses and buttered, great dry.  Name your own poison

Remember where you heard it first.

Old Jules

Radiation ain’t all that bad

sunflower asbestosHi readers.

I saw a movie on Netflix named, Pandora’s Promise.  It was interviews with all manner of people who used to be against nuclear power plants, but changed their minds.  ‘Good’ environmentalists, mostly.

Their logic is that they were duped by other ‘Bad’ environmentalists into thinking nuclear power plants were bad and dangerous, but that not all that many people died from Chernobyl, and not all that many are dying from Fukushima.  And that most of the time nukes are cleaner than coal and don’t kill as many people.

These ‘Good’ Environmentalists understand that without nuclear power they can’t do anything about climate change, which of course, they haven’t been duped by Bad Environmentalists about.  All that stuff about health consequences of radiation exposure was BS.  Bad Science.  Whereas, everything about climate change is GOOD science.  “How dare they,” one pro-nuclear environmentalist shouts of climate change ‘deniers’, “Deny SCIENCE?  This isn’t the DARK ages.”

Convincing movie.  Leads me to think we were all duped a lot earlier than that, back when the USSR was making such a nuisance of itself.  We could have bombed those people back to the stone age if we’d never had our heads confused about fallout shelters, genetic drift, mutants, nuclear winter and all the rest.  Hell, if someone had told us the only thing we had to worry about was the blast, EMP, shockwaves rolling around knocking things down, firestorms, hell, I think we’re all big enough we could have handled that.

What Fukushima actually proves is they’re spending way too much money building safety features into those nuclear power plants.  Those they had didn’t help, and when the whole thing went south it just hasn’t been all that bad.

Plus there are a lot of people alive today who wouldn’t be if we hadn’t let ourselves be duped into believing getting nuked would be a bad thing because of radioactive fallout.

It’s a heartbreaker.

Old Jules

 

The mysterious Kansas parrot fetish

Reminds me a bit of a 1950s song, "Poor Little Robin," "Walkin' walkin' walkin to Missouri."  But this ain't a robin.

Reminds me a bit of a 1950s song, “Poor Little Robin,” “Walkin’ walkin’ walkin to Missouri.” But this ain’t a robin.

Hi readers.  I dunno.  The Kansas State Bird is the Western Meadowlark.  Don’t even bother suggesting that’s what it’s all about.

But all over Kansas City and the surrounding area a person will see that damned cartoon character parrot.  Bumperstickers, flags in yards, even on gravestones.

Occasionally a person will see the word, “Jayhawk” associated with the damned parrot.  A jayhawk isn’t, I believe, an actual bird, so much as a Civil War pejorative used by people with long memories referring to the Kansas-version of the Missouri ‘bushwhackers’.  Irregulars, citizen soldiers using the excuse of war and hatred to rape loot and plunder anyone who disagreed with them.

I don’t think this is a jayhawk.  I think it’s a hell-of-a-lot more likely it’s a damned robin walking to Missouri, and the people displaying it aren’t happy with gasoline being so much cheaper just across the State boundary.

But what the hell do I know?

Old Jules

Hobo Hilton highs for homeless

Opaque windows on all four sides at all levels to allow both privacy and lights are only one of the imaginary, unique, compassionate features.

Opaque windows on all four sides at all levels to allow both privacy and lights are only one of the imaginary, unique, compassionate features.

Hi readers:

When the tsunami of Chinese [and other Asian imports] spawned hobo-jungles of unemployed US workers a lot of us believed it was an ill-wind that blew no good.  However, what we couldn’t have anticipated was the new birth and rejuvenation of the US railroads to deliver those goods to consumers who still had jobs.

As you see in the photo the nearby dumpster provides easy diving as well as convenient disposal of garbage accumulations for community volunteers policing the area.  Note also the 'donation' bin located middle right.  Nearby residents are thereby able to voluntarily dispose of items of their own choosing rather than having things stolen willy-nilly from their vehicles and homes.  A pad located at the donation bin informs residents of the high-rise of who is contributing, and who is not carrying part of the load voluntarily.

As you see in the photo the nearby dumpster provides easy diving as well as convenient disposal of garbage accumulations for community volunteers policing the area. Note also the ‘donation’ bin located middle left. Nearby residents are thereby able to voluntarily dispose of items of their own choosing rather than having things stolen willy-nilly from their vehicles and homes. A pad located at the donation bin informs residents of the high-rise of who is contributing, and who is not carrying part of the load voluntarily.

The logjam automobiles at train crossings caused by new rail freight traffic forced many cities to elevate tracks inside the metropolitan areas.  Unfortunately the consequence was to displace hundreds of dispossessed workers living in hobo jungles.

The Kansas City Metro area, concerned for the welfare of their homeless population and inadequate available shelters during inclement weather, chose to devote resources to a long-term solution.  Based on the assumption US consumers would never again be able to produce anything but hamburgers to sell to one another and jobs  involving the transport, storage, unloading and sales of Asian products, they [the Kansans] built long-term.

Every elevated railroad intersection has a multi-story Hobo Hilton providing warmth, privacy, a place to relax where they  can be easily located and rounded up for police lineups when nearby neighborhoods fail to use the donation-bin with sufficient enthusiasm.

Asian products are fundamentally responsible for this one more demonstration of compassion so typical of US citizens and local governments.  When conditions change, Americans reach out and respond to help other Americans instead of only giving only lip-service “WE WILL NEVER FORGET” promises and self-congratulatory flag-waving.

It’s a warm fuzzy just seeing it.

Old Jules